© Ray GoodfellowMV St Faith, Past and Present

05/04/13 - New photos from yours truly added

MV St Faith

 © Brian Fisher

© Brian Fisher

Steel triple Voith Schneider screw vessel built at Cochrane Yard, Selby, England in 1990 (Yard no.169) for Sealink UK, London, England as a passenger and vehicle ferry

Technical Data

  • Length: 76.09m (overall) 72.40m (between perpendiculars)
  • Breadth of hull: 24.40m (extreme) 117.22m (moulded)
  • Depth: 4.52m
  • Draught: 2.479m
  • Tonnage: 3,009 gross/914 net/574 deadweight
  • Engines: Three 6-cylinder MAN-B&W diesels
  • Power: 2,7000bhp/1,986kW
  • Speed: 12 knots
  • Capacity: 722 passengers, 142 cars 24 trailers via Bow door/ramp/Stern door ramp
  • Call Sign: MMDA5
  • IMO Number: 8907228
  • Registry: London
  • Sister Ships: St Helen, St Catherine, St Cecilia


Current Location

Show / Hide MarineTraffic Map

Please note that the AIS ship position data may be over an hour old and a specific vessels position will only be displayed if its within range of the MarineTraffic system. The ship position data featured on this page is intended for information purposes only and is no way related to the safety of navigation at sea. All the AIS ship position data featured on this page is provided by www.marinetraffic.com and we are therefore not responsible for its content or its accuracy.


History

July 1990: Delivered 1990 to  Sealink U.K. Ltd., London, England . The seats on the deck are a different colour on all the sisters, the ST HELEN/red,  ST CATHERINE/green, ST CECILIA/yellow and ST FAITH/blue.

July 3rd 1990: Arrived in Portsmouth.

July 11th 1190: Promotional cruise.

July 18th 1990: Commenced service between Portsmouth and Fishbourne.

Photoship

Photoship

November 1991: Sealink becomes Wightlink, Isle of Wight Ferries after Sea Containers sell off Sealink British Ferries to Stena Line (whilst retaining the Isle of Wight services). A new livery is introduced for all vessels.

© Brian Fisher

© Brian Fisher

© Ken Larwood   © Ken Larwood

© Ken Larwood (both)

1994: Sea Containers sell Wightlink to a management buy in led by Michael Aiken and financed by venture capitalists CinVen.

© "Ferryman"  © "Ferryman"

© “Ferryman” (both)

© Ray Goodfellow

© Ray Goodfellow

2005: Wightlink is acquired by the Macquarie European Infrastructure Fund, a wholesale fund which makes long-term investments in infrastructure and related assets in European OECD Countries.

© "Ferryman"   © "Ferryman"

© “Ferryman” (both)

28 March 2010:

Synopsis
At 1412 BST on 28 March 2010, the ro-ro passenger ferry, St Faith, landed heavily against fendering while attempting to berth at the Camber Basin linkspan in Portsmouth. Two persons suffered minor injuries and the vessel’s stern ramp was damaged.

On arrival in Portsmouth Harbour, St Faith’s intended berth was occupied by another ferry. As soon as the berth became available, the master manoeuvred St Faith stern-first into Camber Basin, reaching a maximum speed of 8.4 knots. This was faster than normal and increased the ferry’s radius of turn as she approached the berth. Consequently, the ferry was further south than intended, and a significant amount of lateral thrust was applied using the vessel’s Voith Schneider propulsion units to align the stern ramp with the linkspan. The use of lateral force resulted in insufficient ahead power being available to prevent the ferry’s stern ramp from hitting the linkspan fendering at a speed of about 4.5 knots. Although the master had been on duty for the previous 9 hours, it was not considered likely that fatigue was contributory to this accident.

Action taken:
The Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents has written to Wightlink Limited strongly advising that, in addition to the action the company has already taken, all available means are used to monitor its vessels’ speed of approach when berthing.

The Marine Accident Investigation report is available here

© "Ferryman"

© “Ferryman”

© Ray Goodfellow  © Ray Goodfellow

© Ray Goodfellow


We would like to thank: “Ferryman”, Brian Fisher and Ken Larwood for their assistance in producing this feature. All information is believed to be correct and no responsibility is accepted for errors and omissions.

Article © Nigel Thornton and Ray Goodfellow (Dover Ferry Photos Group


Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *