© Ted InghamTs Maid of Orleans (II) – Past and Present

22/03/2017: Gallery updated - NT.

Ts Maid of Orleans

Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection

Steel twin screw turbine steamer, built and engineered by Denny’s of Dumbarton for the British Transport Commission in 1949 (Yard No 1414) as a passenger and mail vessel ( a replacement for the BIARRITZ). 

Technical Data

  • Length: 103.94m (341.3 ft) (overall)
  • Breadth of Hull: 15.24m (52 ft) (extreme)
  • Draught: 5.49m (12.5 ft) (maximum)
  • Tonnage: 3,777 (gross), 2,776 (net), 570 (deadweight)
  • Engines: Denny steam turbines, single reduction gearing
  • Power: 11,000 shp
  • Speed: 22 knots
  • Capacity: 886 1st class and 736 2nd class passengers/1,400 passengers and also 25-30 cars during winter time (crane loaded hold)(1962/66)
  • Call Sign: MACM
  • IMO Number: 5217543, Official Number:183012
  • Registry: London/United Kingdom

History

September 9th 1948: Launched. First vessel built for the Short Sea Routes to be fitted with a Denny Brown stabiliser.

Roy Thornton Collection  Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection

May 1949: During trials attained just over 22.5 knots

May 18th 1949: Delivered to British Transport Commission, Southern Region, London, England

June 13th 1949: Left Dumbarton for Southampton


Roy Thornton Collection  Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection  Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection  Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection  Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection


June 1949: Arrived Dover from the builders

Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection  © A G Jones

Roy Thornton Collection (left) © A G Jones (right)

June 22nd 1949: Made a cruise for press, port and railway representatives between Dungeness and South Foreland Lights.

Stéphane Poulain Collection

Stéphane Poulain Collection

June 23rd 1949: Maiden voyage from Folkestone to Boulogne.

Roy Thornton Collection  Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection (both)

Stéphane Poulain Collection

Stéphane Poulain Collection

Nicolas Levy Collection  Nicolas Levy Collection

Nicolas Levy Collection (both)

1958/59 (Winter): Due to exhaust fume problems her funnel was heightened and fitted with a “fireman’s helmet” type spark arrester during an overhaul in Southampton, and her second class accommodation was improved during subsequent overhauls in 1962 and 1966.

© Courtesy of Michael Woodland

© Courtesy of Michael Woodland

Roy Thornton Collection  Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection (both)

August 1963: Wrapped her mooring ropes round her propellers when coming astern into No.1 berth at Folkestone. Took frogmen two days to free her.

Roy Thornton Collection  Stéphane Poulain Collection

Roy Thornton Collection (left) Stéphane Poulain Collection  (right)

Roy Thornton Collection  © Ken Larwood

Roy Thornton Collection (left) © Ken Larwood (right)

1964: Vessels painted in the new livery of British Railways, (blue hull and red funnels) and the “Double – Arrow”

© A G Jones  © A G Jones

© A G Jones (both)

1964: Left on her own when the CANTERBURY departed.

Roy Thornton Collection  © A G Jones

Roy Thornton Collection (left) © A G Jones (right)

© A G Jones  © A G Jones

© A G Jones (both)

1965 (summer): The fleet reserve vessel ST PATRICK joined her. FALAISE, herself, acted as relief vessel to COTE D’AZUR and INVICTA.

© Ted Ingham  © Ted Ingham

© Ted Ingham

November 1969: It was announced that British Rail’s Shipping and International Services Division (S.I.S.D.) had adopted the new brand name Sealink and as a consequence all vessels were painted in the new house colours.

© Brian Fisher

© Brian Fisher

May 23rd 1970: Introduced for a short time on “Golden Arrow” service between Dover – Calais.

July 20th 1972 – July 22nd 1972: Used as a relief vessel between Weymouth – Guernsey – Jersey.

© Ken Larwood

© Ken Larwood

August 7th 1972: Final day in service between Folkestone – Boulogne.

August 9th 1972 – September 30th 1972: “Golden Arrow” service between Dover – Calais.

1973 (Summer): One class service between Dover – Calais.

1973: Sealink trading name painted on hulls

June 28th 1974 – July 8th 1974: Operated between Weymouth – Guernsey – Jersey.

September 27th 1975: Final day in service.

  

 © “ToptoToe”

September 30th 1975: Laid up in Newhaven.

© Ted Ingham

Roy Thornton Collection

November 3rd 1975: Stern damaged by collision. Damage made good.

November 6th 1975: Towed to Spain for breaking by tug IBAIZABEL TRES

November 9th 1975: Arrived at Santander, Steelnorte S.L., San Esteban de Pravia, Spain for scrapping.


All information is believed to be correct and no responsibility is accepted for any errors or omissions found. All items included in this article are subject to © copyright. We would like to take this opportunity of thanking: Micke Asklander (Faktaomfartyg), Ted Ingham, A G Jones, Ken Larwood, Nicolas Levy,Stéphane Poulain and Michael Woodland for there assistance in compiling this feature.

Article © Nigel Thornton and Ray Goodfellow (Dover Ferry Photos Group)


4 Comments

  1. Enjoyed viewing website, my uncle Len Brown was purser on the “Maid of Orleans” known as “Robin”,as a child I was taken on board, great memories.
    I wonder what happened to all the ship models that were in “Southern House” , I know Dover Transport Museum has one, I believe Maritime Museum has some, be good if these could be brought back to Dover and displayed!! after all its part of Dover history.
    Once again thanks for the nostalgia
    Eric Friend

    1. Eric,

      Thank you for your comments. It’s a labour of love!

      Agreed about the models although I’m unsure, other than the Lord Warden at Dover Transport Museum, what the other models were?
      I did hear that one was Vortigern. Personally speaking, I would love to see that!

      Thanks again and keep viewing
      Rgds
      Nigel Thornton

      PS Your father may remember mine, the “Major” in Southern House?

  2. Hi Nigel, I can remember these models in glass case’s in a top back room? I also knew Peter Wainwright who worked in Southern House.
    Regard
    Eric Friend

  3. I served on the maid of orleans both as a boy and steward in the fifties, before going deep sea ,happy days.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *