© J K ByassMV Camber Queen – Past and Present

MV Mira Troia

ex Camber Queen

British Railways Board

Camber Queen – © British Railways Board

Steel twin Voith Schneider double ended vessel built in 1961 at Philip & Son Ltd., Dartmouth (Yard Number. 1319) for British Railways Board, London, England as a passenger and vehicle ferry

Technical Data

  • Length: 50.68 m (overall) 44.20 m (between perpendiculars)
  • Breadth: 13.11 m
  • Depth: 3.36 m
  • Draught: 1.83 m
  • Tonnage: 293 gross/117 net/90 deadweight
  • Engines: 2 Oil 4SA 8 – cylinder Crossley Bros diesels
  • Power: 471 kW/640 bhp
  • Speed: 10.5 knots
  • Capacity: 175 passengers (max), 36 cars (max)
  • Call Sign: GXVX
  • IMO Number: 5058985
  • Official Number: 303157
  • Port of Registry: Portsmouth/UK, Portugal
  • Sister Ship: Fishbourne (II)

History

April 13th 1961: Camber Queen launched.

1961: Delivered to the British Transport Commission Southern Region, London, England. She was originally intended to be named WOOTTON.

© Derek Longly

© Derek Longly

August 29th 1961: Commenced service Portsmouth – Fishbourne.

Sealink News

Sealink News (Portsmouth)

September 5th 1961: Service Portsmouth – Yarmouth.

January 29th 1963: Operated between Portsmouth – Yarmouth when Fishbourne was obstructed by floating ice.

© J K Byass

© J K Byass (Roy Thornton Collection)

1977: Given extra watertight bulkhead in the two passenger lounges aboard in order to increase their weight carrying capacity. This meant the loss of the bar area aboard the sisters and about ten seats on each. The work was estimated to be a cost in the region of £30,000.

January 1st 1979: Registered to Sealink UK Ltd.

© Derek Longly

© Derek Longly (03/07/1981)

© Tim Webb  © Tim Webb

© Tim Webb (28/07/1980) (Left) and (11/07/1982) (Right)

© Brian Fisher

© Brian Fisher (May 1983)

July 27th 1984: Sealink taken over by Sea Containers Ltd.

1984: Final sailing between Portsmouth – Fishbourne.

1984: Sold to Transando (Transportes Fluviales de Sado Ltda), of Setubal, Portugal who operated her as the MIRA TROIA between Setubal – Tróia.

1998: Broken up in Portugal


All information is believed to be correct and no responsibility is accepted for any errors or omissions. All items included in this article are subject to © copyright. We would like to take this opportunity of thanking: Brian Fisher, Derek Longly, Tim Webb and Andreas Wörteler for their assistance in producing this feature.

Article © Nigel Thornton and Ray Goodfellow (Dover Ferry Photos Group)


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