Uncategorized


Related Posts

© Tony Garner

MV Southsea – Past and Present

MV Southsea Steel twin screw motor vessel built in 1948 at Wm. Denny & Bros., Dumbarton, Scotland (Yard No 1411) As a […]

Roy Thornton Collection

Christmas Past at the Port of Dover

This article was originally published on the 1st December 2012 but with the festive season rapidly approaching it’s time to resurrect an old favourite. As can be seen below, the ferries have certainly changed over the years (in both number and in size) but there is still one tradition that remains and that is the local fleet’s official day of rest, Christmas Day. In these modern days of the 24 hour operation at the Port of Dover it is very rare to see the ships laid up.

© Mike Jackson

Camber Infill & Berth 2 – (Part 2)

In January 1988 Dover Harbour Board confirmed that more sand would be dredged from the Goodwin Sands to reclaim the remainder of the Camber at the Eastern Docks. The Board obtained a licence from the Crown Estate to dredge the Goodwins and for every cubic metre of sand dredged the Harbour Board paid the Crown a fee.

Nigel Thornton Collection

Lighthouse and Café, Prince of Wales Pier.

The Prince of Wales Pier was completed in May 1902, having been started ten years earlier. The then Prince of Wales laid the foundation stone in 1893. Preliminary designs were done by Sir John Goode (President of the Institution of Civil Engineers), although he died in March 1892

Dover Port News, Roy Thornton Collection

Admiralty Pier Train Ferry Berth

With ships becoming much larger only vessels built up to and before the early 1970’s could fit into the original train ferry dock situated within Dover Western Docks. The new generation of ships that were then being developed were twice the size in terms of size and capacity and they could make up to five round trips of the busy Dover Straits each day.

Dover Eastern Docks - The Advent of Drive on Drive Off (1952-53)

Dover Eastern Docks – The Advent of Drive on Drive Off (1952-53)

It is probably hard to believe that it is now over sixty years since motorists were first able to drive their cars directly on and off the ships at the Port of Dover. We often take it for granted that we can drive into the port and drive directly on to our ship with the whole process taking a matter of minutes. Prior to this people taking their cars across the Channel watched from the quayside as their cars were crane loaded as cargo into the ship’s hold as they boarded the ship on foot via the gangway.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. We never collect sensitive information and we do not sell any of the data we collect. Under the GDPR regulations browser cookies are now considered pseudo-anonymized personal data and since we use cookies to deliver relevant services to you we would like to get your permission to do so. For further information please refer to our Privacy & Cookie Policies

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close