© Mike JacksonCamber Infill & Berth 2 – (Part 2)

Camber Infill & Berth 2 (Part 2)

© Ken Larwood

© Ken Larwood


(Link to Part 1)

In January 1988 Dover Harbour Board confirmed that more sand would be dredged from the Goodwin Sands to reclaim the remainder of the Camber at the Eastern Docks. The Board obtained a licence from the Crown Estate to dredge the Goodwins and for every cubic metre of sand dredged the Harbour Board paid the Crown a fee.

Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection

Seven Seas Dredging, of Weybridge, won the £1 million contract for the infill of the rest of the Camber and the two month project was due to start in early March of 1988.

Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection

The five hectares (about 12 acres) reclaimed stretched from the two berths to the torpedo boat pens, where the lifeboat used to be moored before the last reclamation.

© Ken Larwood  © Ken Larwood

© Ken Larwood  Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection

© Ken Larwood & Roy Thornton Collection

© Fotoflite

© Fotoflite

Roy Thornton Collection  Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection

Roy Thornton Collection

Dover Port News

Dover Port News

The dredger KANKELOON, used for the reclamation work of the first half of the Camber in 1985-86, was again to make the regular runs bringing 750,000 cubic metres of sand from the Goodwins to Dover harbour.

© Henk Guddee  Dover Extra April 29th, 1988

© Henk Guddee (left) Dover Extra April 29th, 1988 (right)

The two original ferry berths (made redundant because they could not accommodate the new super ferries) that were built in 1952 were demolished as part of the reclamation.

© Ken Larwood  Roy Thornton Collection

© Ken Larwood &  Roy Thornton Collection

Dover Port News

Dover Port News

© Mark Willis

 © Mark Willis

“With the complete infilling of the Camber, the former war time torpedo boat pens were then demolished in 1990 and a new cargo berth was created on the South Jetty. The jetty was designed to be capable of accepting ships of up to 190m in length and drawing up to 8m at and state of tide.

Dover Port News

Dover Port News

The Dover Cargo Terminal (DCT) was mainly built to handle imports of fresh fruit and vegetables” although sometimes it is used for cruise vessels and ferry lay-over.

© Mike Jackson  © Mike Jackson

© Mike Jackson  © Mike Jackson

© Mike Jackson

The widening of Pier A, as it is called, to accommodate the new berth Number Two and the construction of the wall at the edge of the reclaimed land had already started. The new berth was similar in design the No 3 berth which was redeveloped in 1986.

Dover Port News  Dover Port News

Dover Port News

© Mark Willis

 © Mark Willis

© Ken Larwood  © Ken Larwood

© Ken Larwood  © Ken Larwood

Roy Thornton Collection  © Ken Larwood

© Ken Larwood  © Ken Larwood

Roy Thornton Collection

© Ken Larwood & Roy Thornton Collection

© Mark Willis

 © Mark Willis


All information is believed to be correct and no responsibility is accepted for any errors or omissions. All items included in this article are subject to © copyright. We would like to take this opportunity of thanking: Henk Guddee, Mike Jackson, Ken Larwood and Mark Willis for their assistance in producing this feature.

Article © Nigel Thornton and Ray Goodfellow (Dover Ferry Photos Group)


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